Ebele’s Dance of Destiny

Ebele’s Dance of Destiny

Ebele's story began in the bustling city of Lagos, where the hum of the market and the rhythm of daily life were as constant as the sun. She lived in a spacious house with her father, Chike, her stepmother, Nneka, and her two stepsisters, Adaeze and Akachi. The house was always filled with the scent of spices and the sound of Nneka's stern voice.


Ebele's mother had been the heart of the home, her laughter as bright as the fabrics she wove. But since her passing, the colors had faded, and Ebele's world had turned grey. Her mother's death had been sudden, leaving a young Ebele to navigate her grief alone. Chike, her father, was a kind man, but he had grown distant, losing himself in his work to escape his sorrow.


Ebele found solace in the stories her mother had left behind, tales of brave women and magical lands. She would often sit under the iroko tree, her mother's favorite spot, and remember the way her mother's eyes sparkled when she spoke of the wonders of Nigeria's eastern states.

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As Ebele grew, so did her responsibilities. Nneka expected perfection in every chore, and Ebele worked tirelessly from dawn until dusk. Her stepsisters watched with scornful eyes, never lifting a finger to help. They were envious of Ebele's natural grace and the way she found joy in the smallest things, like the way the sun painted the sky at dusk.


Despite the hardships, Ebele never lost hope. She carried her mother's legacy within her, the belief that kindness and compassion could change the world. And it was this belief that would soon lead her to a night that would change her life forever. The Lagos’ midnight ball!


One day, there was exciting news about a big ball happening in the city. It was a special event where a prince from Benin was looking for a wife. The anticipation for the ball grew as the day approached. Ebele watched from the sidelines as her stepsisters prepared with lavish dresses and endless chatter about catching the prince's eye. Nneka had made it clear: Ebele was not to attend. Her place was at home, tending to the needs of the household while they basked in the festivities.

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On the day of the ball, the house was a flurry of activity. Nneka and her daughters departed in a whirl of silk and perfume, leaving Ebele in the quiet emptiness of the grand house. As the sun dipped below the horizon, Ebele's thoughts turned to her mother. She could almost hear her mother's voice, urging her to reach for her dreams despite the odds.


With a heavy heart, Ebele made her way to the iroko tree, her mother's resting place. The air was thick with the scent of earth and the whispers of the past. It was here, bathed in moonlight, that Mama Wata met her. Mama Wata listened to Ebele's story, her gaze never wavering. With a gentle nod, she granted Ebele the means to attend the ball—a dress that glowed with the hues of twilight and sandals that whispered of forgotten paths. But her warning was clear: return before midnight, or the magic would be gone.


Ebele arrived at the ball to a chorus of gasps and murmurs. She moved through the crowd like a breeze, her laughter mingling with the music. The prince, struck by her genuine spirit, asked for her hand in dance. Together, they spun stories in motion, their hearts beating a rhythm older than time.

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But as midnight neared, Ebele's thoughts turned to Mama Wata's words. She fled, the echo of the clocktower filling her with dread, leaving behind a single sandal in a rush to leave.


The prince was sad to know that she had disappeared. From that ball, he searched for her deployed the security to do the same. His search was tireless, his determination fueled by the memory of their dance. For weeks, he searched, holding on to that single sandal that she had left behind in a hurry. Finally, one day, he arrived at Ebele's home with the security to search for Ebele., Nneka's attempts to hide her were futile. The sandal slipped onto Ebele's foot as if it had been made for her alone. 


The price heaved a sigh of relief, shed a few tears and pulled her into a warm embrace to the shame of her stepmother and her children. He went on her knees and asked if she would love to be his bride, the future queen of the land. Ebele responded in the affirmative because she had also been lost in the enchanting vibes she picked up from the prince the night they had the dance. 


In the days that followed, Ebele went through some of the best times since her mom’s death. She was beautified, honoured, celebrated and enthroned like a princess. Ebele's story became a popular tale of beautiful, lasting love. And as she walked hand in hand with the prince, it was clear that Ebele's journey was only just beginning.

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