What You Should Know About Bird Flu And Its Precautions

How to Protect Yourself from Bird Flu: What You Need to Know

Bird flu, or avian influenza, is a viral infection that affects both wild and domestic birds. It can be highly contagious and sometimes deadly for the birds. In some rare cases, it can also infect humans and cause serious illness or death. The most common strain of bird flu that poses a threat to humans is called H5N1, which has been circulating in Asia, Europe and North America since 2003. Here are some facts and tips about bird flu and how to prevent it.

 

 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS WHILE USING THE SNIPER INSECTICIDE AT HOME

 

- Bird flu spreads through contact with infected birds or their droppings, saliva or nasal secretions. It is hard to control because it can affect many different types of birds, including chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys and more.

 

- The risk of human infection from bird flu is low, but not zero. According to ABC News' chief health and medical editor Dr Jennifer Ashton, only 865 people have contracted bird flu since 2003, but more than half of them died. The virus can mutate and become more easily transmissible to humans, which could lead to a pandemic.

 

- "Humans can get this virus, but it's been pretty rare and can be fatal when contacted," Dr Jennifer said.

 

ODOMOS MOSQUITO REPELLENT: DISPELLING MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS

 

- You can reduce your risk of exposure to bird flu by avoiding contact with sick or dead birds, washing your hands frequently, and wearing protective clothing and masks if you work with poultry or visit live bird markets.

 

- You can also safely enjoy poultry and eggs, as long as you cook them thoroughly. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) advises that poultry should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165°F, measured with a food thermometer in the thickest part of the meat. Eggs should be cooked until the yolks and whites are firm.

 

- The USDA also ensures that the poultry sold in the US is free from bird flu. The agency has detected over 47 million cases of bird flu in birds since January 2022, mostly in the US, and has taken measures to prevent the spread of the virus, such as culling infected flocks and disinfecting affected areas.

 

- The chance of infected poultry entering the food chain is "extremely low," the USDA said. The Food Safety and Inspection Service, part of the USDA, is in charge of inspecting all poultry sold in the US and abroad.

 

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